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Josh, Lucas, Michelle, Cameron, Sam, Kazu, Maddy D., and Austin.



Group Members and Roles

  • Lucas Wiltjer- Speech
  • Kazu Koba- Video PSA
  • Austin Hunt-Photographer
  • Josh Ren- Writer/Graphic
  • Sam Beppler-Journalist
  • Cameron Karbum-Debator
  • Michelle Pablo-Radio PSA
  • Maddy Do-Linh- Social Media

Group Slogan

No representation without population, because size does matter.

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What Your Group Wants -- Plan for New Constitution

We want the number of representatives for each state to be based on population. This way, small states with less denizens will not have equal power as ones with many more. We also wish to have a bicameral system, where there are two chambers or legislature. Our 700,000 citizens should not have to be subjected to equal power as a mere 27,000 of Delaware. Each citizen has different opinions; therefore it is impossible to represent every single one with one.


Bullet Points of Your Plan

  • Representatives based on population size

  • Two chambers or the legislative house

  • Three Branches
  • One of two Reps voted by people
  • Other rep selected from nominations by elected rep

Orator: Text of Your Speech


My Fellow Americans I call to you, for that is what you are, Americans. We have traveled far and lost much, but we have gained the richest treasure. With humble beginnings as pilgrims and starving gold diggers of the Chesapeake, we hacked civilization out forest and Indian alike. Then clashed, toe to toe, rifle to rifle, bayonet to bayonet with the French. We grew and prospered, and spread to new territory with our limbs, and welcomed new and unique peoples to our land with our heart. Our loyalty to
our mother country was unfailing yet not appreciated by the exploitative lords of England. So, we overthrew the tyrannical claws of the vile and aristocratic Empire. We marched on Yorktown and squeezed out every last corrupted sinner that amasses the British regulars, with but a rag-tag army of farmers and Frenchmen. Through all the losses we found a priceless gift, a gift for all of humanity that we, Americans, have the ability to grant, Democracy.

Through all that, and proposed with this great opportunity, I call to you to stop acting as Georgians, Pennsylvanians or even Virginians. If we are to capitalize on this opportunity, we must act as one, as Americans. Our government must arise from the people, not from the states. We must unify, not divide, our nation should be a nation, not a loose cannibalistic pack of rabid states that will fluctuate and legislate our economy into the ground. Legislation should be nationalized and the power centralized; though the power itself should be separated between three bodies of government that regulate themselves: the legislative, the judicial and the executive branches.

Mainly, we wish to have a representative system based on the population of a state, not by the state. A puny dwarf of a state with a mere 27,000 should not have equal representation as a GREAT AND POWERFUL state such as VIRGINIA, a massive 700 thousand. If we represent by state, it would not fairly represent the wishes of the people. Why should a man from New Jersey than a Man from Virginia? Was it not Virginians who kindled the embers of the revolution? Was it not Virginia who bred the General who was to guide our weary soldiers through the epic battles? Was it not Virginia who birthed this nations tobacco economy which is all but keeping hounds of hell at bay in these trying times? It was, indeed Virginia, not New Jersey.

I call this convention to be wary of the scheming and calculating New Jersey representatives. They are driven to usurp the powers of our vulnerable nation and over-represent themselves. They are the vengeful minority seeking to take our rights and our freedoms from us. They do not respect the findings of this nation, the idea that one man is equal to another and should have the same representation. Voting for them will only lead to an america where the minority outweighs the majority, and the gift of democracy will be lost forever.





Why Our Plan is Good:

It allows for true, unbiased government. If small states had as much votes as large states, the general population of the United States would be unequally represented. We also have a fair system of government where the people can elect representatives. The New Jersey plan is worried about the large-states overpowering the smaller ones, but it is the same as having Virginia being split up into small states and having individual votes. Population should not be deterred by the area of a state.


Print Journalist: Write Up of Convention Activity

October 1, 2013: Electricity was in the air in room G-108 today, where the constitutional convention kicked off with a brisk and punctual start. James Madison, representing the Virginia Plan, with intellectual enlightenment glowing from his very skull, was first to address the crowd. The hearts of true Americans were instantly captured. With unmatched confidence, Madison brought the crowd to attention with words that touched the heart of every true, honest, and brave American in the audience. He spoke to the representatives as representatives of individuals, even when many had their loyalty torn, some even putting the state above the people. As one people and one nation, we need to be treated as one. First on Madison's agenda was a three-branch government. This ingenious plan of checks and balances institutes “three bodies of government that regulate themselves: the legislative, the judicial and the executive branches.” Madison's aspirations to ensure Americans never fall prey to another tyrannical government are clear. Still bursting with vivacity, Madison tackled the most important topic of the day: representation. He called for “a representative system based on the population of a state, not by the state,” exercising his American faith, that all men are equal and so, they should be represented so. Brandishing democracy to guide our great nation, James Madison reminded us all of the importance of equality.

James Patterson was next to take the stage, representing the New Jersey Plan. Rumors have not been confirmed nor denied, however, there was good evidence to suggest Patterson had spent the previous night touring the taverns of the city at untimely hours. His mental capacity was so burdened that when asked for his very name, an awkward and lingering pause preceded “Uh... Pa-Pa-Paterson. James Patterson.” By the putrid stench lingering in his wake and pungent tang of whiskey still flowing from his tongue, one could assume he'd been out all night. Following a somnambulant stroll to the microphone, the crowd released an uncontainable groan, foreseeing a clear waste of time coming from the representative of the pretentious poorly-endowed people of New Jersey. Deceit was in the air. When challenged with the slightest mumbles arising from the convention, he lost nearly all capability of fluent speech. Timid, jerky language and uncontrollable stutters, accompanied by involuntary tremors told all and left the audience dizzy. Having no remarkable contribution to the nation, Patterson represented the state as what it was: a small minority with a big ego to prove. Patterson stressed the equality of states, ignoring the fact they consist of individual, equal people. He sounded so obsessed over the size of states, he had lost sight of the bigger picture: American equality.

The great compromise proposed a merging of the James's. It was just another insult to James Madison; to Americans. She hypocritically accused James Madison as “ill prepared” while she craned her neck, struggling to read the words, presumably scribbled down minutes before the convention. This ill preparation of her own only delayed the feeble argument to follow. Doubt ruled her every move, preferring eternal bickering between forms of representation and with a constant fear of Britain's judging eye. This plan could only do us harm.

Last in the lime light, the Crispus Attucks Coalition and the Dixiecrat Bloc finished off the speeches. Arguing over topics irrelevant to the formation of our government, it was a surprise to hear their petty stances at all. When the heat to build a nation was so high, domestic issues like this just didn't reach the same level of urgency.

Following these introductory speeches, a heated debate ensued. With the Crispus Attucks Coalition and the Dixiecrat Bloc still bickering garrulously, the Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, and Great Compromise settled the real conflict. James Madison, accompanied by his assistant, continued to advocate the necessity of individual equality through the politeness of a gentleman yet the lethality of a soldier. Even when James Patterson formed an analogy (which displayed his callow irresponsibility as a gambling man) defending equality of states, James Madison voiced a rebuttal in the same terms of the analogy, proving once again that it is not the state which matters, but the people it represents. The great compromise was again so timid and timorous, they failed to express anything more than a fear of diversity.

James Madison shined as the spectacle of the speeches and when the time to debate rolled around, it became unquestionably clear who supported the best plan for our nation's fruitful future: The Virginia Plan.


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